My thoughts (alongside those of Robert Reich and others), on the role of social media and consumer-brand relationships in the Market Basket saga (featured in the current Boston Globe Magazine).

nprfreshair
nprfreshair:

"I learned that courage was not the absence of fear, but the triumph over it. The brave man is not he who does not feel afraid, but he who conquers that fear."  - Nelson Mandela 
 
Today is Nelson Mandela Day, marked by his birthday. This is the first Mandela Day since his death last December. 

Madiba, the world is better off for having had you in it. True leadership.

nprfreshair:

"I learned that courage was not the absence of fear, but the triumph over it. The brave man is not he who does not feel afraid, but he who conquers that fear."  - Nelson Mandela 

 

Today is Nelson Mandela Day, marked by his birthday. This is the first Mandela Day since his death last December. 

Madiba, the world is better off for having had you in it. True leadership.

npr
onthemedia:

WHAT CAN WE LEARN ABOUT THE INTERNET FROM THE DISASTROUS DASHCON CONVENTION LAST WEEKEND?
Fandom works precisely because it has no leaders. People feed off one another’s creativity and energy, and you don’t need anyone’s permission to squirrel your own stories away on your Tumblr. They are yours and they are everyone’s. No one’s asking permission, no one’s organizing them beyond a few hashtags, and no one is “responsible” with keeping the fandom running smoothly. 
But to create an event, one that exists in the world, and requires transactions (both socially and monetarily), well, fandom doesn’t necessarily equip one to be able to pull that off. It feels like the DashCon organizers were faced with an event that they willed into being, and then required maintenance, follow-through, and organization. And it fell apart.

onthemedia:

WHAT CAN WE LEARN ABOUT THE INTERNET FROM THE DISASTROUS DASHCON CONVENTION LAST WEEKEND?

Fandom works precisely because it has no leaders. People feed off one another’s creativity and energy, and you don’t need anyone’s permission to squirrel your own stories away on your Tumblr. They are yours and they are everyone’s. No one’s asking permission, no one’s organizing them beyond a few hashtags, and no one is “responsible” with keeping the fandom running smoothly. 

But to create an event, one that exists in the world, and requires transactions (both socially and monetarily), well, fandom doesn’t necessarily equip one to be able to pull that off. It feels like the DashCon organizers were faced with an event that they willed into being, and then required maintenance, follow-through, and organization. And it fell apart.

npr
npr:

"A New Device Lets You Track Your Preschooler … And Listen In" via Allie Caren
Thanks to a new wristband from LG, parents can now track a child’s every move with their smartphones. The KizON uses Wi-Fi and GPS technology to update parents on their child’s current location, and KizON even includes a direct call feature. But this new development in technology leaves some asking if kids have a right to privacy.
– Alexander
Image: LG

Interesting. How might this affect parenting behavior and decisions? Would we become more vigilant with this device — or less?

npr:

"A New Device Lets You Track Your Preschooler … And Listen In" via Allie Caren

Thanks to a new wristband from LG, parents can now track a child’s every move with their smartphones. The KizON uses Wi-Fi and GPS technology to update parents on their child’s current location, and KizON even includes a direct call feature. But this new development in technology leaves some asking if kids have a right to privacy.

– Alexander

Image: LG

Interesting. How might this affect parenting behavior and decisions? Would we become more vigilant with this device — or less?

nprfreshair
nprfreshair:

Fresh Air tech contributor Alexis Madrigal says soon we could be swallowing mini computers with our pills: 

What if you could swallow a computer the size of a poppy seed, and it could report back exactly if and when you took a medicine while recording how your body responded to the drug?
It sounds crazy, but the tiny computers exist. It sounds dangerous, but they were approved by the Food and Drug Administration. And the company that makes them, Proteus, has tens of millions of dollars and relationships with some of the biggest drug companies in the world, including Novartis.
David O’Reilly, the chief product officer at Proteus, says he believes that someday soon every single pill a doctor prescribes will come with an electronic component embedded right in it that tracks the pill’s absorption in your body.

Here’s how it works
image via techie feed

nprfreshair:

Fresh Air tech contributor Alexis Madrigal says soon we could be swallowing mini computers with our pills: 

What if you could swallow a computer the size of a poppy seed, and it could report back exactly if and when you took a medicine while recording how your body responded to the drug?

It sounds crazy, but the tiny computers exist. It sounds dangerous, but they were approved by the Food and Drug Administration. And the company that makes them, Proteus, has tens of millions of dollars and relationships with some of the biggest drug companies in the world, including Novartis.

David O’Reilly, the chief product officer at Proteus, says he believes that someday soon every single pill a doctor prescribes will come with an electronic component embedded right in it that tracks the pill’s absorption in your body.

Here’s how it works

image via techie feed

fastcompany

There’s been a bunch of “feminist” advertising as of late, incorporating social science research. I’ve previously posted about Dove’s “Beauty Patch” campaign. Above see “Sorry, Not Sorry” from Pantene and, below, “Like a Girl” from Always:

The question is: how does it affect viewers?

Could these advertisements be just as effective for men as they are for women? And, do they build the brands?

hum4nbehavi0r
Don’t confuse innovation with novelty.

You may have successfully designed the latest shiny object for people to get excited about…at least until a new shiny object came out.

And that’s the reason product features are more a novelty than an innovation. They are added in an attempt to differentiate, but not reinvent.

It’s not a bad thing, but it can’t be counted on to add any long-term value.

Novelty can drive sales, but the impact does not last.
Start With Why by Simon Sinek (via hum4nbehavi0r)